2019 Chautauqua Season

Jun 23, 2019 ‐ Aug 25, 2019


This library is composed of lectures and sermons that have taken place at the incomparable Chautauqua Institution. Internationally renowned as a center for Education, the Arts, Religion and Recreation, Chautauqua was founded on the belief that everyone “has a right to be all that he can be — to know all that he can know.”

Free

Sessions

Rabbi Sharon Brous • Interfaith Worship Sermon

Jun 23, 2019 10:45am ‐ Jun 23, 2019 12:00pm

Sermon Title: “A Tale of Two Stories: A Tale of Hope and Responsibility”

Sharon Brous
Senior and founding rabbi, IKAR

Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation.

Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forwardand the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms.

Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign.

Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.

(Note: This biography was up-to-date as of the date of the lecture. Biographies are not updated over time.)

Resources

Banner photo by Sarah Yenesel

Speaker(s):
Free

Rabbi Sharon Brous • Interfaith Worship Sermon

Jun 24, 2019 9:15am ‐ Jun 24, 2019 10:00am

Sermon Title: “Reclaiming Religion: Seeing the Broken and the Beautiful”

Sharon Brous
Senior and founding rabbi, IKAR

Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation.

Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forwardand the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms.

Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign.

Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.

(Note: This biography was up-to-date as of the date of the service. Biographies are not updated over time.)

Resources

Banner photo by Sarah Yenesel

  • The Chautauquan Daily coverage:

Speaker(s):
Free

Laurie L. Patton • Interfaith Lecture Series

Jun 24, 2019 2:00pm ‐ Jul 3, 2019 3:30pm

“That Driver Could Be God: How the Bhagavad Gita Changed the World”

Laurie L. Patton
President, Middlebury College 

Laurie L. Patton is the 17th president of Middlebury and the first woman to lead the institution in its 218-year history. She is a leading authority in South Asian history and culture, and the author or editor of eleven books in these fields. She has also translated the ancient Hindu text, The Bhagavad Gita, for Penguin Classics Series, and is the author of three books of poetry—the last book, House Crossing, just published in 2018.

Dr. Patton began her career at Bard College, where she was assistant professor of Asian religions from 1991 to 1996. From 1996 to 2011 she served on the faculty and administration at Emory University, where she was the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Religions and the inaugural director of Emory’s Center for Faculty Development and Excellence in the Office of the Provost. While at Emory she served as chair of the religion department from 2000 to 2007.

Professor Patton then served as the Durden Professor of Religion and Duke University Dean of Arts & Sciences until 2015. At Duke she oversaw 36 academic departments and programs in arts and sciences for the school, which awards 80 percent of Duke’s bachelor degrees. Patton also oversaw Trinity’s $435 million commitment to the “Duke Forward” campaign.

Laurie Patton believes in building a stronger and more resilient public sphere and in fostering increased opportunities for informed discussion and debate about today’s most challenging issues. Early in her leadership, she launched the first institution-wide discussion on Middlebury’s intellectual direction, Envisioning Middlebury, to help inform Middlebury’s new strategic direction, which was approved in late 2017.

Also in her first years as Middlebury’s president, Patton’s team has initiated in numerous programs to strengthen the relationship between campuses in Middlebury, VT., and Monterey, California; raised over 40M in financial aid scholarships; inaugurated several new programs focusing on inclusivity on campus; and created a new environmental goal after Middlebury achieved carbon neutrality in 2016.

From 2008 to 2011, she served as president of the American Society for the Study of Religion, and in 2018-19, she will be the president of the American Academy of Religion, an 8000 member scholarly society for the study of religion.

In April, 2018, she was elected to be a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, as a leader in two fields—religion/philosophy and education.

(Note: This biography was up-to-date as of the date of the lecture. Biographies are not updated over time.)  

Resources

Banner photo by Vishakha Gupta

Speaker(s):
Free

Rabbi Sharon Brous • Interfaith Worship Sermon

Jun 25, 2019 9:15am ‐ Jun 25, 2019 10:00am

Sermon Title: “The Amen Effect: “I Can’t Heal You, But I Can See You"”

Sharon Brous
Senior and founding rabbi, IKAR

Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation.

Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forward and the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms.

Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign.

Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.

(Note: This biography was up-to-date as of the date of the service. Biographies are not updated over time.)

Resources

Banner photo by Sarah Yenesel

  • The Chautauquan Daily coverage:

Speaker(s):
Free

Ori Z. Soltes • Interfaith Lecture Series

Jun 25, 2019 2:00pm ‐ Jun 25, 2019 3:30pm

“Obvious and Obscure: Moments that Have Transformed Judaism”

Ori Z. Soltes
Goldman Professorial Lecturer in theology and fine arts, Georgetown University 

Ori Z. Soltes teaches art history, theology, philosophy, and political history at Georgetown University. He is former Director of the B’nai B’rith Klutznick National Jewish Museum, and has curated more than 85 exhibitions on history, ethnography, and modern and contemporary art there and at other venues across the country and overseas. He is the author of over 280 books, articles, exhibition catalogues, and essays on a variety of topics. Recent books include Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian and Muslim Art Draw from the Same Source; Searching for Oneness: Mysticism in Judaism, Christianity and Islam; Untangling the Web of the Middle East; Magic and Religion in the Greco-Roman World: The Beginnings of Judaism and Christianity; and most recently, God and the Goalposts: A Brief History of Sports, Religion, Politics, War and Art

Professor Soltes leads study tours to different parts of the world, including the religious world’s most sacred sites.

(Note: This biography was current as of the date of the lecture. Biographies are not updated over time.)  

Resources
Banner photo by Mhari Shaw

Speaker(s):
Free

Rabbi Sharon Brous • Interfaith Worship Sermon

Jun 26, 2019 9:15am ‐ Jun 26, 2019 10:00am

Sermon Title: “Holy Hutzpah: Our Inheritance of Willful Opposition”

Sharon Brous
Senior and founding rabbi, IKAR

Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation.

Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forward and the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms.

Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign.

Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.

(Note: This biography was up-to-date as of the date of the service. Biographies are not updated over time.)

Resources

Banner photo by Sarah Yenesel

  • The Chautauquan Daily coverage:

Speaker(s):
Free

Nikole Hannah-Jones • Amphitheater Lecture Series

Jun 26, 2019 10:45am ‐ Jun 25, 2019 12:00pm
Expiration Date: Dec 23, 2019

Lecture Title: “1619: A Moment That Changed the World”

Nikole Hannah-Jones
Investigative reporter, 
The New York Times Magazine

MacArthur Genius Grant Fellow Nikole Hannah-Jones covers racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine, and has spent years chronicling the way official policy has created — and maintains — racial segregation in housing and schools. She has written extensively on the history of racism — from 1619 and the first recorded slave ship arriving in the Americas to the present day — as well as school resegregation, and the decades-long failure of the federal government to enforce the landmark 1968 Fair Housing Act.

Her piece “Worlds Apart” in The New York Times Magazine won the National Magazine Award for “journalism that illuminates issues of national importance” as well as the Hillman Prize for Magazine Journalism. In 2016, she was awarded a Peabody Award and George Polk Award for radio reporting for her “This American Life” story, “The Problem We All Live With.” She was named Journalist of the Year by the National Association of Black Journalists, and was also named to The Root 100. Her reporting has also won Deadline Club Awards, Online Journalism Awards, the Sigma Delta Chi Award for Public Service, the Fred M. Hechinger Grand Prize for Distinguished Education Reporting, the Emerson College President’s Award for Civic Leadership, and was a previous finalist for the National Magazine Award. Additionally, Hannah-Jones co-founded the Ida B. Wells Society for Investigative Reporting with the goal of increasing the number of reporters and editors of color.

She holds a Master of Arts in mass communication from the University of North Carolina and earned her BA in history and African-American studies from the University of Notre Dame.

(Note: This biography was up-to-date as of the date of the lecture. Biographies are not updated over time.) 

Resources

Banner photo by Vishakha Gupta

Speaker(s):
Free

Dan Egan • Amphitheater Lecture Series/CLSC Author Presentation

Jun 26, 2019 10:45am ‐ Jun 26, 2019 12:00pm

Lecture Title: “The Death and Life of the Great Lakes”

Dan Egan
Author, The Death and Life of the Great Lakes 

For thousands of years the pristine Great Lakes were separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the roaring Niagara Falls and from the Mississippi River basin by a “sub-continental divide.” Beginning in the late 1800s, these barriers were circumvented to attract freighters from the Atlantic and to allow Chicago’s sewage to float out to the Mississippi. These were engineering marvels in their time―and the changes in Chicago arrested a deadly cycle of waterborne illnesses―but they have had horrendous unforeseen consequences.

In an age when dire problems like the Flint water crisis or the California drought bring ever more attention to the indispensability of safe, clean, easily available water, Dan Egan’s The Death and Life of the Great Lakes is a powerful paean to what is arguably our most precious resource, an urgent examination of what threatens it and a convincing call to arms about the relatively simple things we need to do to protect it.

Egan is a reporter at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and a senior water policy fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's School of Freshwater Sciences. He has twice been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and he has won the Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University Award, John B. Oakes Award, AAAS Kavli Science Journalism Award, and J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award. A graduate of the Columbia Journalism School, he lives in Milwaukee with his wife and children.

(Note: This biography was up-to-date as of the date of the lecture. Biographies are not updated over time.)

Resources

Banner photo by Sarah Yenesel

Speaker(s):
Free

Amy Laura Hall • Interfaith Lecture Series

Jun 26, 2019 2:00pm ‐ Jun 26, 2019 3:30pm

“Is Fear Your Only God? How a Medieval Visionary, Julian of Norwich, Teaches Courage, Still, Today”

Amy Laura Hall
Associate professor of Christian ethics, Duke Divinity School 

Amy Laura Hall is the Duke University Divinity School Associate Professor of Christian Ethics. She received her BA from Emory University and her MDiv and PhD degrees from Yale University.

Professor Hall was named a Luce Fellow in Theology for 2004-2005, and has received funding from the Lilly Foundation, the Josiah Trent Memorial Foundation, the American Theological Library Association, the Child in Religion and Ethics Project, the Pew Foundation, and the Project on Lived Theology. She has served on the steering committee of the Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy Center and as a faculty member for the FOCUS program of the Institute on Genome Sciences and Policy. Having served as a faculty adviser with the Duke Center for Civic Engagement and as a faculty advisor for the NCCU-Duke Program in African, as well as in the African American & Diaspora Studies, she currently teaches with and serves on the faculty advisory board for Graduate Liberal Studies, and also as a core faculty member of the Focus Program in Global Health.

Dr. Hall serves as an elder in the Rio Texas Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. Her community service includes Labor Sabbath, an effort with the AFL-CIO of North Carolina to encourage congregations of faith to talk about labor unions, and, from August 2013 to December 2017, she wrote a monthly column for The Herald-Sun in Durham, N.C. Professor Hall organized a conference against torture in 2011 titled “Toward a Moral Consensus against Torture,” and a “Conference against the Use of Drones in Warfare” October 20-21, 2017. In collaboration with the North Carolina Council of Churches, she organized a workshop with legal scholar Richard Rothstein held in October 2018. 

Dr. Hall is the author of four books: Kierkegaard and the Treachery of Love; Conceiving Parenthood: The Protestant Spirit of Biotechnological Reproduction; Writing Home with Love: Politics for Neighbors and Naysayers; and Laughing at the Devil: Seeing the World with Julian of Norwich. Her articles include “The Single Individual in Ordinary Time: Theological Engagements in Sociobiology,” which was a keynote lecture given with Kara Slade at the Society for the Study of Christian Ethics in 2012, and “Torture and American Television,” published in the April 2013 issue of Muslim World, a volume that Hall guest-edited with Daniel Arnold. “His Eye Is on the Sparrow: Collectivism and Human Significance” appeared in a 2016 volume titled Why People Matter with Baker Publishing. Her new essay on Kierkegaard and love will appear in The T&T Clark Companion to the Theology of Kierkegaard, to be published by Bloomsbury T&T Clark. Her book, Laughing at the Devil, was chosen for the 2019 Virginia Festival of the Book. 

Professor Hall continues work on a longer research project on masculinity and gender anxiety in mainstream, white evangelicalism

(Note: This biography was current as of the date of the lecture. Biographies are not updated over time.)  

Resources

Banner photo by Vishakha Gupta

Speaker(s):
Free

Rabbi Sharon Brous • Interfaith Worship Sermon

Jun 27, 2019 9:15am ‐ Jun 27, 2019 10:00am

Sermon Title: “Royal Pains: Eternal Outsider, On the Inside”

Sharon Brous
Senior and founding rabbi, IKAR

Rabbi Sharon Brous is a leading voice in reanimating religious life in America, working to develop a spiritual roadmap for soulful, multi-faith justice work in Los Angeles and around the country. She is the senior and founding rabbi of IKAR, which was started in 2004 and has become a model for Jewish revitalization in the US and beyond. With the goal of reinvigorating Jewish practice and inspiring people of faith to reclaim a moral and prophetic voice, IKAR quickly became one of the fastest growing and most influential Jewish congregations in the country. Today it is credited with sparking a rethinking of religious life in a time of unprecedented disaffection and declining affiliation.

Brous’s 2016 TED talk, “Reclaiming Religion,” has been viewed by more than 1.3 million people and translated into 20 languages. In 2013, she blessed President Obama and Vice President Biden at the Inaugural National Prayer Service, and Mayor Eric Garcetti at his inauguration in LA in 2017. She spoke at the Women’s March in Washington, DC in 2017, and at the national launch of the Poor People’s Campaign and the opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in 2018. Brous was named #1 on the Newsweek/The Daily Beast list of the most influential Rabbis in America, and has been recognized by The Forward and the Jerusalem Post as one of the fifty most influential Jews. She was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in 2018 based on Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms.

Brous is in the inaugural cohort of Auburn Seminary's Senior Fellows program, which unites top faith leaders working on the frontlines for justice. Brous also sits on Mayor’s Interfaith Collective and on the faculty of the Shalom Hartman Institute-North America and REBOOT, and serves on the International Council of the New Israel Fund and the national steering committee for the Poor People’s Campaign.

Rabbi Brous is a graduate of Columbia University, was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, and lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three children.

(Note: This biography was up-to-date as of the date of the service. Biographies are not updated over time.)

Resources

Banner photo by Sarah Yenesel

  • The Chautauquan Daily coverage:

Speaker(s):
Free
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