The Forgotten: History and Memory in the 21st Century

Aug 11, 2018 ‐ Aug 18, 2018


The Forgotten: History and Memory in the 21st Century

It is said that those who do not remember their history are doomed to repeat it. So we look to that history, and to the communities, movements and ideas existing at the fringes in our world today. What do we forget, at our own peril? How can we be stewards of remembering, and what must we remember? We are responsible for the histories of our societies, our families, and of our own individual selves. How can we preserve, honor, and ultimately learn from what was and what is? This meeting of the past and present hinges upon what — and who — we must remember. 

Interfaith Lecture Theme :: Not to Be Forgotten: A Remembrance on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In this 50th anniversary year of his assassination we honor the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. What have we forgotten about the messages taught by Dr. King in the 1960s? What did we fail to learn about race in America, at our own peril? Why do current day Americans love to quote from the “early King” and “I Have a Dream,” but steer away from Dr. King’s later understandings about the intersection of race, war and poverty? Let us remember, at this time in our history, in order that we might truly begin to live his dream.


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Morning Worship Service: Irene Monroe

Preview Available

Morning Worship Service: Irene Monroe

Aug 12, 2018 10:45am ‐ Aug 12, 2018 12:00pm

The Reverend Monroe is an ordained minister and motivational speaker who speaks for a sector of society that is frequently invisible. She does a weekly Monday segment, now a podcast called “All Revved Up!” on WGBH (89.7 FM), a Boston member station of National Public Radio (NPR). She is also a weekly Friday commentator on New England Channel NEWS (NECN), and is the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail, the Guided Walking Tour of Beacon Hill: Boston’s Black Women Abolitionists.

A Huffington Post blogger and a syndicated religion columnist, Rev. Monroe’s columns appear in 23 cities across the country and in the U.K, Ireland, and Canada. She also writes a weekly column in the Boston home LGBTQ newspaper Baywindows, Cambridge Chronicle, and Opinion pieces for the Boston Globe. She states that her "columns are an interdisciplinary approach drawing on critical race theory, African American, queer, and religious studies,” while also focusing on sexism, classism, and anti-Semitism.  She has spoken on these issues at the United Nations International School.

Rev. Monroe, a founder and now member emeritus of the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), is also a founder of Equal Partners of Faith, the Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry (RCFM), and Christian Lesbians Out (CLOUT). Chosen in October 2009 by MSNBC as one of "10 Black Women You Should Know," Monroe has been profiled in O, the Oprah Magazine, and also in the Gay Pride Episode of "In the Life TV," a segment nominated for an educational Emmy. 

A native of Brooklyn, NY, Monroe graduated from Wellesley College and Union Theological Seminary at Columbia University, and served as a pastor at an African-American church in New Jersey before coming to Harvard Divinity School to do her doctorate. She received the Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching several times while being the head teaching fellow of the Rev. Peter Gomes, the Harvard Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church.

Featured in the film, "For the Bible Tells Me So," an exploration of the intersection between religion and homosexuality in the U.S., her coming out story is profiled in "CRISIS: 40 Stories Revealing the Personal, Social, and Religious Pain and Trauma of Growing up Gay in America," as well as in "Youth in Crisis."  Profiled twice in the Boston Globe for her LGBT activism, in 1997 Boston Magazine cited her as one of Boston's 50 Most Intriguing Women, and in 1998 Monroe was the first African American lesbian to be bestowed the honor of being Grand Marshall in the Boston Pride Celebration. For her activism, she has received numerous awards, and her papers are in the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College's research library on the history of women in America.

Speaker(s):
Free

Vespers: Irene Monroe

Preview Available

Vespers: Irene Monroe

Aug 12, 2018 4:00pm ‐ Aug 12, 2018 5:00pm

The Reverend Monroe is an ordained minister and motivational speaker who speaks for a sector of society that is frequently invisible. She does a weekly Monday segment, now a podcast called “All Revved Up!” on WGBH (89.7 FM), a Boston member station of National Public Radio (NPR). She is also a weekly Friday commentator on New England Channel NEWS (NECN), and is the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail, the Guided Walking Tour of Beacon Hill: Boston’s Black Women Abolitionists.

A Huffington Post blogger and a syndicated religion columnist, Rev. Monroe’s columns appear in 23 cities across the country and in the U.K, Ireland, and Canada. She also writes a weekly column in the Boston home LGBTQ newspaper Baywindows, Cambridge Chronicle, and Opinion pieces for the Boston Globe. She states that her "columns are an interdisciplinary approach drawing on critical race theory, African American, queer, and religious studies,” while also focusing on sexism, classism, and anti-Semitism.  She has spoken on these issues at the United Nations International School.

Rev. Monroe, a founder and now member emeritus of the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), is also a founder of Equal Partners of Faith, the Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry (RCFM), and Christian Lesbians Out (CLOUT). Chosen in October 2009 by MSNBC as one of "10 Black Women You Should Know," Monroe has been profiled in O, the Oprah Magazine, and also in the Gay Pride Episode of "In the Life TV," a segment nominated for an educational Emmy. 

A native of Brooklyn, NY, Monroe graduated from Wellesley College and Union Theological Seminary at Columbia University, and served as a pastor at an African-American church in New Jersey before coming to Harvard Divinity School to do her doctorate. She received the Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching several times while being the head teaching fellow of the Rev. Peter Gomes, the Harvard Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church.

Featured in the film, "For the Bible Tells Me So," an exploration of the intersection between religion and homosexuality in the U.S., her coming out story is profiled in "CRISIS: 40 Stories Revealing the Personal, Social, and Religious Pain and Trauma of Growing up Gay in America," as well as in "Youth in Crisis."  Profiled twice in the Boston Globe for her LGBT activism, in 1997 Boston Magazine cited her as one of Boston's 50 Most Intriguing Women, and in 1998 Monroe was the first African American lesbian to be bestowed the honor of being Grand Marshall in the Boston Pride Celebration. For her activism, she has received numerous awards, and her papers are in the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College's research library on the history of women in America.

Speaker(s):
Free

Morning Worship Service: Irene Monroe

Preview Available

Morning Worship Service: Irene Monroe

Aug 13, 2018 9:15am ‐ Aug 13, 2018 10:00am

The Reverend Monroe is an ordained minister and motivational speaker who speaks for a sector of society that is frequently invisible. She does a weekly Monday segment, now a podcast called “All Revved Up!” on WGBH (89.7 FM), a Boston member station of National Public Radio (NPR). She is also a weekly Friday commentator on New England Channel NEWS (NECN), and is the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail, the Guided Walking Tour of Beacon Hill: Boston’s Black Women Abolitionists.

A Huffington Post blogger and a syndicated religion columnist, Rev. Monroe’s columns appear in 23 cities across the country and in the U.K, Ireland, and Canada. She also writes a weekly column in the Boston home LGBTQ newspaper Baywindows, Cambridge Chronicle, and Opinion pieces for the Boston Globe. She states that her "columns are an interdisciplinary approach drawing on critical race theory, African American, queer, and religious studies,” while also focusing on sexism, classism, and anti-Semitism.  She has spoken on these issues at the United Nations International School.

Rev. Monroe, a founder and now member emeritus of the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), is also a founder of Equal Partners of Faith, the Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry (RCFM), and Christian Lesbians Out (CLOUT). Chosen in October 2009 by MSNBC as one of "10 Black Women You Should Know," Monroe has been profiled in O, the Oprah Magazine, and also in the Gay Pride Episode of "In the Life TV," a segment nominated for an educational Emmy. 

A native of Brooklyn, NY, Monroe graduated from Wellesley College and Union Theological Seminary at Columbia University, and served as a pastor at an African-American church in New Jersey before coming to Harvard Divinity School to do her doctorate. She received the Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching several times while being the head teaching fellow of the Rev. Peter Gomes, the Harvard Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church.

Featured in the film, "For the Bible Tells Me So," an exploration of the intersection between religion and homosexuality in the U.S., her coming out story is profiled in "CRISIS: 40 Stories Revealing the Personal, Social, and Religious Pain and Trauma of Growing up Gay in America," as well as in "Youth in Crisis."  Profiled twice in the Boston Globe for her LGBT activism, in 1997 Boston Magazine cited her as one of Boston's 50 Most Intriguing Women, and in 1998 Monroe was the first African American lesbian to be bestowed the honor of being Grand Marshall in the Boston Pride Celebration. For her activism, she has received numerous awards, and her papers are in the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College's research library on the history of women in America.

Speaker(s):
Free

Morning Lecture Series: Sara Bloomfield

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Morning Lecture Series: Sara Bloomfield

Aug 13, 2018 10:45am ‐ Aug 13, 2018 12:00pm

Sara J. Bloomfield is director of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, a global institution that raises Holocaust awareness, deepens understanding of the lessons of the Holocaust, confronts denial, and advances genocide prevention. 

Bloomfield joined the museum in 1986 when it was a project in development. She served in a number of positions before becoming director in 1999. Bloomfield established the museum’s Institute for Holocaust Documentation; the Levine Institute for Holocaust Education; the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies; and the Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide. In 2007, the museum’s diplomatic efforts led to the opening of the International Tracing Service Archive in Bad Arolsen, Germany. For the museum’s 10th Anniversary, Bloomfield obtained the first-ever loan of Anne Frank’s original writings. During the Balkan wars of the 1990s, Bloomfield negotiated an understanding to rescue endangered artifacts and archives that document the Holocaust in Croatia.  

She serves on the International Auschwitz Council, has been a member of the board of the International Council of Museums/USA, and is a recipient of the Officers Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland. She was also the first recipient of the Jan Karski Award of the Anti-Defamation League, Washington Chapter.

Bloomfield holds a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from Northwestern University, and a Master’s in education from John Carroll University.

Speaker(s):
Free

Lincoln Applied Ethics Series: Volker Benkert

Lincoln Applied Ethics Series: Volker Benkert

Aug 13, 2018 4:00pm ‐ Aug 13, 2018 5:00pm

Volker Benkert, assistant professor of history, Arizona State University
“Memory, History and Forgetting in Germany. Apologetic and Redemptive Memory of World War II and the Holocaust in Contemporary Germany”

Volker Benkert is an Assistant Professor of History at Arizona State University. His research focuses on history and memory of both totalitarian regimes on German soil. He is the author of Glückskinder der Einheit. Berlin 2017. (Children of Communism. Biography, Socialization and Generation in East Germany before and after 1989)

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Morning Worship Service: Irene Monroe

Preview Available

Morning Worship Service: Irene Monroe

Aug 14, 2018 9:15am ‐ Aug 14, 2018 10:00am

The Reverend Monroe is an ordained minister and motivational speaker who speaks for a sector of society that is frequently invisible. She does a weekly Monday segment, now a podcast called “All Revved Up!” on WGBH (89.7 FM), a Boston member station of National Public Radio (NPR). She is also a weekly Friday commentator on New England Channel NEWS (NECN), and is the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail, the Guided Walking Tour of Beacon Hill: Boston’s Black Women Abolitionists.

A Huffington Post blogger and a syndicated religion columnist, Rev. Monroe’s columns appear in 23 cities across the country and in the U.K, Ireland, and Canada. She also writes a weekly column in the Boston home LGBTQ newspaper Baywindows, Cambridge Chronicle, and Opinion pieces for the Boston Globe. She states that her "columns are an interdisciplinary approach drawing on critical race theory, African American, queer, and religious studies,” while also focusing on sexism, classism, and anti-Semitism.  She has spoken on these issues at the United Nations International School.

Rev. Monroe, a founder and now member emeritus of the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), is also a founder of Equal Partners of Faith, the Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry (RCFM), and Christian Lesbians Out (CLOUT). Chosen in October 2009 by MSNBC as one of "10 Black Women You Should Know," Monroe has been profiled in O, the Oprah Magazine, and also in the Gay Pride Episode of "In the Life TV," a segment nominated for an educational Emmy. 

A native of Brooklyn, NY, Monroe graduated from Wellesley College and Union Theological Seminary at Columbia University, and served as a pastor at an African-American church in New Jersey before coming to Harvard Divinity School to do her doctorate. She received the Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching several times while being the head teaching fellow of the Rev. Peter Gomes, the Harvard Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church.

Featured in the film, "For the Bible Tells Me So," an exploration of the intersection between religion and homosexuality in the U.S., her coming out story is profiled in "CRISIS: 40 Stories Revealing the Personal, Social, and Religious Pain and Trauma of Growing up Gay in America," as well as in "Youth in Crisis."  Profiled twice in the Boston Globe for her LGBT activism, in 1997 Boston Magazine cited her as one of Boston's 50 Most Intriguing Women, and in 1998 Monroe was the first African American lesbian to be bestowed the honor of being Grand Marshall in the Boston Pride Celebration. For her activism, she has received numerous awards, and her papers are in the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College's research library on the history of women in America.

Speaker(s):
Free

2018 Interfaith Lecture Series: Peniel Joseph

Preview Available

2018 Interfaith Lecture Series: Peniel Joseph

Aug 14, 2018 2:00pm ‐ Aug 14, 2018 3:15pm

Dr. Peniel E. Joseph joined the University of Texas at Austin as Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy in the Fall of 2015.  He received a joint professorship appointment at the LBJ School of Public Affairs as the Barbara Jordan Chair in Ethics and Political Values and at the History Department in the College of Liberal Arts. Prior to joining the UT faculty, Dr. Joseph was a professor at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, where he also founded the school’s Center for the Study of Race and Democracy to promote engaged research and scholarship focused on the ways issues of race and democracy impact the lives of global citizens. He received a B.A. from SUNY at Stony Brook and a Ph.D. from Temple University.

Dr. Joseph’s career focus has been on what he describes as “Black Power Studies,” which encompasses interdisciplinary fields such as Africana studies, law and society, women’s and ethnic studies, and political science. He is a frequent national commentator on issues of race, democracy, and civil rights, and has authored award-winning books, Waiting ‘til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America and Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama. Dr. Joseph’s most recent book, Stokely: A Life, has been called the definitive biography of Stokely Carmichael, the man who popularized the phrase “black power” and led the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, known as the SNCC.

The recipient of fellowships from Harvard University’s Charles Warren Center, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Ford Foundation, Dr. Joseph’s essays have appeared in The Journal of American History, The Chronicle Review, The New York Times, The Black Scholar, Souls, and American Historical Review. Dr. Joseph is a frequent contributor to Newsweek, TheRoot and Reuters, and his articles, Op-Eds, and book reviews have been published in newspapers from The Washington Post to The New York Times. Dr. Joseph’s commentary has been featured on National Public Radio, The Colbert Report, PBS, and MSNBC. 

Dr. Joseph’s article, “How Martin Luther King Jr.’s Assassination Changed America 50 year Ago and Still Affects Us Today,” is especially pertinent in this week’s legacy remembrance of Dr. King. 

Speaker(s):
Free

CLSC: Paisley Rekdal

Preview Available

CLSC: Paisley Rekdal

Aug 14, 2018 3:30pm ‐ Aug 14, 2018 4:30pm

Winner of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs Award for Creative Nonfiction, The Broken Country: On Trauma, a Crime, and the Continuing Legacy of Vietnam, uses a violent incident that took place in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 2012 as a springboard for examining the long-term cultural and psychological effects of the Vietnam War. 

To make sense of the shocking and baffling incident ― in which a young homeless man born in Vietnam stabbed a number of white men purportedly in retribution for the war ― Paisley Rekdal draws on a remarkable range of material and fashions it into a compelling account of the dislocations suffered by the Vietnamese and also by American-born veterans over the past decades. She interweaves a narrative about the crime with information collected in interviews, historical examination of the arrival of Vietnamese immigrants in the 1970s, a critique of portrayals of Vietnam in American popular culture, and discussions of the psychological consequences of trauma. 

The Broken Country allows us to better understand transgenerational and cultural trauma and advances our still complicated struggle to comprehend the war.

Paisley Rekdal is the author of a book of essays, The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee, and four books of poetry, including Animal Eye, which was a finalist for the 2013 Kingsley Tufts Prize and winner of the UNT Rilke Prize. Her work has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Fellowship, an NEA Fellowship and two Pushcart Prizes, among other honors. In May 2017, she was named Utah's Poet Laureate.

Speaker(s):
Free

Morning Worship Service: Irene Monroe

Preview Available

Morning Worship Service: Irene Monroe

Aug 15, 2018 9:15am ‐ Aug 15, 2018 10:00am

The Reverend Monroe is an ordained minister and motivational speaker who speaks for a sector of society that is frequently invisible. She does a weekly Monday segment, now a podcast called “All Revved Up!” on WGBH (89.7 FM), a Boston member station of National Public Radio (NPR). She is also a weekly Friday commentator on New England Channel NEWS (NECN), and is the Boston voice for Detour’s African American Heritage Trail, the Guided Walking Tour of Beacon Hill: Boston’s Black Women Abolitionists.

A Huffington Post blogger and a syndicated religion columnist, Rev. Monroe’s columns appear in 23 cities across the country and in the U.K, Ireland, and Canada. She also writes a weekly column in the Boston home LGBTQ newspaper Baywindows, Cambridge Chronicle, and Opinion pieces for the Boston Globe. She states that her "columns are an interdisciplinary approach drawing on critical race theory, African American, queer, and religious studies,” while also focusing on sexism, classism, and anti-Semitism.  She has spoken on these issues at the United Nations International School.

Rev. Monroe, a founder and now member emeritus of the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC), is also a founder of Equal Partners of Faith, the Religious Coalition for the Freedom to Marry (RCFM), and Christian Lesbians Out (CLOUT). Chosen in October 2009 by MSNBC as one of "10 Black Women You Should Know," Monroe has been profiled in O, the Oprah Magazine, and also in the Gay Pride Episode of "In the Life TV," a segment nominated for an educational Emmy. 

A native of Brooklyn, NY, Monroe graduated from Wellesley College and Union Theological Seminary at Columbia University, and served as a pastor at an African-American church in New Jersey before coming to Harvard Divinity School to do her doctorate. She received the Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching several times while being the head teaching fellow of the Rev. Peter Gomes, the Harvard Pusey Minister in the Memorial Church.

Featured in the film, "For the Bible Tells Me So," an exploration of the intersection between religion and homosexuality in the U.S., her coming out story is profiled in "CRISIS: 40 Stories Revealing the Personal, Social, and Religious Pain and Trauma of Growing up Gay in America," as well as in "Youth in Crisis."  Profiled twice in the Boston Globe for her LGBT activism, in 1997 Boston Magazine cited her as one of Boston's 50 Most Intriguing Women, and in 1998 Monroe was the first African American lesbian to be bestowed the honor of being Grand Marshall in the Boston Pride Celebration. For her activism, she has received numerous awards, and her papers are in the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College's research library on the history of women in America.

Speaker(s):
Free

Morning Lecture Series: Beverly Warren

Preview Available

Morning Lecture Series: Beverly Warren

Aug 15, 2018 10:45am ‐ Aug 15, 2018 12:00pm

The shooting deaths of four Kent State University students in a 1970 Vietnam War protest inflicted wounds that remain raw today. The flashpoint event challenged Kent State to act as a steward of history without dwelling in the past, and move into the future transformed by the lessons of that fateful day. Kent State University Beverly Warren shares the story of her institution's journey from remembrance to renewal.

Beverly J. Warren has served as president of Kent State University since 2014. Warren oversees one of the nation’s largest university systems, ranked in the first-tier of Best National Universities by U.S. New & World Report, with more than 39,000 students across eight campuses in Northeast Ohio.

Warren launched and is leading an ambitious six-year strategic plan that is elevating and amplifying the University’s contributions in the areas of research, service and innovation.  As the 50th Anniversary of May 4, 1970 approaches, Warren is spearheading the university’s global exploration of the resulting lessons, learnings and remembrances in a journey toward becoming a vanguard of peaceful resolution and a champion of civil discourse. In addition to housing and sponsoring the May 4 Visitors Center on the Kent campus, the University annually commemorates the day when lives were forever altered when the Ohio National Guard fired into a crowd of demonstrators, killing four people and wounding nine.

Warren earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a Master of Science degree from Southern Illinois University. She holds two doctorates, an Ed.D. in administration of higher education from the University of Alabama and a Ph.D. in exercise physiology from Auburn University.

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